Homestead Kitchen Resources


Homestead Kitchen

homestead resources

Our Favorite Traditional Foods / Homestead Kitchen Resources

Learning to prepare whole, traditional foods can be overwhelming, especially if you’re trying to keep to a budget and feed a growing family at the same time.  That’s why I’ve created this list of my favorite homestead kitchen resources to share with you.  This list contains only the items that I feel have been well worth our investment, items that we depend on to get nourishing traditional foods on our table day after day.

If you aren’t familiar with “traditional foods” read here to find out more.

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If you click on one of the product links on this page, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you, which helps to pay for the hosting of this blog. I promise to ONLY, EVER link to products that I either use myself and LOVE, or hope to have one day.  All of my comments are honest and are meant to support you as you make the best decisions for feeding your family.  Thank you for your support!  

 

Pantry Items

homestead kitchen resourcesWhen I first started out preparing traditional foods, I WISHED I could take a peek inside someone else pantry.. someone who already understood this whole traditional foods thing and had a way of making it work for their family.  That’s what this list is all about.  This is next best thing to a peek inside our homestead kitchen pantry.

I have linked most of these items to Amazon, not because that’s necessarily the best place to purchase them, but because it’s the simplest way for me to show the specific product details.  We grow most of our own meat, milk, eggs, (and veggies in the summer).  We shop at local farms, Costco, Earth Fare, our local health food co-op, and yes, we do purchase plenty of items from Amazon too.  Take this information and purchase your pantry items wherever you find the most reasonable prices and quality products.  If the Amazon price seems outrageous, it probably is.  Check your local options for a better price.

To find local, sustainable farms in your area, check out REAL Milk Finder, Eatwild Directory of Farms, Local Harvest Directory of Farms, or contact your locaWAPF Chapter Leader

For more information on how we find the best possible prices ~ to keep our real food lifestyle within our real life budget ~ check out our free mini-ebook:  Making Real Food an Affordable Option:  Tips From Our Family to Yours

 

Our Homestead Kitchen Pantry

 

Grains (Einkorn, Oats, & Rye)

Cornmeal

Popcorn

Rice

Beans

Pasta

Lentils

Split Peas

Kefir Grains

Sourdough Starter

Kombucha Scoby

Coconut Milk

Tortilla Chips (This is really a compromise food, not a traditional food, though I do have intentions to begin making my own someday 😉 )

Chocolate Chips (Ditto. Used occasionally for chocolate chip birthday waffles 🙂 )

 

Kitchen Tools

homestead resources

*Please keep in mind that we purchased these things slowly over time, saving up for some of the bigger purchases and making do the best we could as we waited.

Family Grain Mill – We buy our grains (Einkorn and Oats mostly) in bulk and grind them at home to preserve nutrients and cut down on costs (organic, whole grain flours are pricey!)  We got the package that came with a flaker attachment (so we can flake our own oats) and an extra hand crank base (You know, just in case the world ends and we have to go without electricity..  What’s the point of grinding your own grain if you can’t count on having it when the world ends? 😉 )

Gamma Seal Lid – This lid makes getting our grain buckets open SO MUCH EASIER!!  Do you want to keep your thumb nails in tact?  Get a gamma seal lid!  You can color-code them if you have multiple varieties.  Great investment.

Bosch Universal Plus Stand Mixer – Let me introduce you to my best friend.. It’s got everything you could ever need.  It can stir, whip, blend, knead, chop, puree… there’s an attachment for everything.  And it’s POWERFUL!  Which is a must if you’re going to be using any soaked dough recipes.  (Ask me how I know 🙁 RIP pretty Kitchen Aid mixer, circa 2012 ).  I did actually manage to break my first blender attachment though.  If you get a blender attachment make sure to get this one.  It’s designed SO MUCH BETTER.

Hamilton Beach Crock Pot (x2) – There is nothing super special about this crock pot.  I chose it for two reasons:  First, there was some evidence in my research that suggested that the Hamilton Beach had a lesser risk of lead in the ceramic coating of the crockery, though I haven’t tested it myself.  The second is that the “warm” setting is hot enough to keep my 24 hour bone broth just barely at a simmer overnight.  Because we make a lot of bone broth, and because we also cook beans in the crock pot, we actually bought two of these, one for dinner if necessary and one for broth, or beans, or whatever else I’m stocking for the freezer.

Excalibur 9 Tray Dehydrator – This is pretty much the Cadillac of food dehydrators.  I had to wait quite awhile to make this purchase.  I do love it though.  It has an adjustable temperature which is great because I can turn it way down and use it to rise bread dough.  It’s also helpful that the 9 trays can be removed, leaving plenty of space to put quart jars of yogurt or a large bowl of dough.

Immersion Blender – Makes blending for soups and sauces so much easier!

Coffee Grinder – We don’t even drink coffee any more, but this little guy gets a work out in our kitchen!  I use it to grind flax and many other seeds for adding to recipes, as well as spices for our diy spice blends.

Emile Henry Dutch Oven – <3 <3 <3 I love my dutch oven!  I use it to bake my crusty, no-knead sourdough loaf.  It bakes perfectly every time and slides right out of the pot, leaving zero mess behind.  I actually think I’ve only washed it once…

Pampered Chef Pizza Stone (x2) – We have two of these stones and use them every Friday night for our our homemade sourdough pizza.  Don’t bother with any other brand of stoneware.  It will be a total waste of money. Ask me how I know…  :/

Cast Iron Skillet – My first choice for stove-top cooking.  I’m hoping one day to add another skillet and a griddle to our kitchen.

Stainless Steel Stockpot – Stainless steel is my second choice for stove top cooking.

Stainless Steel Baking Sheets – This is what we use for roasting veggies and baking cookies.

Danish Dough Whisk – Mixes dry or wet ingredients quickly, thoroughly, with less effort, and without overworking the dough in the process.  I use this to stir and aerate my sourdough each day.

Sourdough Jar – This jar has been perfect for my sourdough.  In place of the lid, I use a small kitchen towel folded in half and secured with a rubber band.  This allows the sourdough to breathe without inviting in any bugs.

Vintage Pyrex Bowls – I cannot even fathom why on earth Pyrex ever stopped making these bowls!  Why, oh why, oh whyyyyyyy!??  If you ever come across them second hand, scoop them up!!  I use them for absolutely everything.

Pyrex Storage Bowls – You aren’t still using hormone-disrupting plastic storage bowls are you?  Upgrade to glass!

Ball Jars – I can’t even begin to tell you the many ways we use wide mouth jars in our home: goats milk, kombucha, saurkraut, salsa, milk kefir, herbal teas, dried herbs and spices, candles, pencils, caterpillars, all things diy, not to mention canning tomatoes.  We always have a supply and NEVER turn down free jars!  I also find it handy to have a supply of plastic lids because sometimes I just don’t want to fuss with clanky metal lids.

Corelle Dinnerware – Because homestead kids need to be able to help with kitchen chores and heavy, expensive stoneware dishes really prohibit that.  Also, they take up so, very little cupboard space.  That’s important if you have a teeny, tiny homestead kitchen like ours.

Lifefactory Glass Water Bottle with Silicone Sleeve – Each of the kids has their own color.  You can also buy sippy tops for them if you’ve got toddlers.

Thermos Stainless Steel Water Bottle – I take it everywhere.  Keeps my water or tea super cold all day long.

Propane Gas Smoker – Great capacity.  We use this smoker for our home-brined bacon and hams each year at butchering time.

 

Favorite Traditional Foods Cookbooks and Recipe Blogs

homestead resources

From Scratch – Quick, easy basics based on traditional food principles.

The Elliott Homestead Family Table – Hands down, my favorite… though it appears to be out of stock at the moment. Sorry.  🙁

Back to Butter – Another traditional foods cookbook?  I’ll take it!

Nourishing Traditions – This book is like a college course on traditional foods ~ followed by almost 600 pages of recipes for everything from beet kvass and milk kefir to vanilla ice cream.  (Read here about how this book entirely changed the course of my life.)

The Elliott Homestead– Homestead blog + great traditional foods recipes.

Traditional Cooking School – Traditional foods blog + video courses and cooking school.

Raising Generation Nourished – Traditional foods recipes + more, and more, and more recipes!

Passionate Homemaking – Lindsay’s recipes are not 100% traditional foods, but they are loosely based on the same philosophy we follow.  Hers was the first blog I found after reading Nourishing Traditions more than eight years ago. She’s no longer blogging actively, but the site is still up and running and I reference it often for some of our family favorites.

 

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Homestead Kitchen Resources

 

What are your favorite homestead kitchen resources?

Let us know in the comments which tools, appliances, pantry staples, cookbooks, or blogs make life easier in your kitchen!

 

And as always friends, please remember that I’ve got kids sledding down the stairs on Costco boxes as I write to you…

So, if you think I’ve forgotten something important, have any questions or comments, or simply a bit of encouragement to share, please use the comments below, send me an email, or find us on Facebook.

I’d love to hear from you.

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